Penguin Canada

  • IRON WIDOW Nouv.

    IRON WIDOW

    Xiran Jay Zhao

    B>Pacific Rim meets The Handmaid''s Tale in this blend of Chinese history and mecha science fiction for YA readers./b>br>br>The boys of Huaxia dream of pairing up with girls to pilot Chrysalises, giant transforming robots that can battle the aliens that lurk beyond the Great Wall. It doesn''t matter that the girls die from the mental strain. br>br>When 18-year-old Zetian offers herself up as a concubine-pilot, it''s to assassinate the ace male pilot responsible for her sister''s death. But when she gets her vengeance, it becomes clear that she is an Iron Widow, a rare kind of female pilot who can sacrifice males to power up Chrysalises instead. br>br>To tame her frightening yet valuable mental strength, she is paired up with Li Shimin, the strongest male pilot in Huaxia, yet feared and ostracized for killing his father and brothers. But now that Zetian has had a taste of power, she will not cower so easily. She will take over instead, then leverage their combined strength to force her society to stop failing its women and girls. Or die trying.

  • Vanishing and Other Stories explores emotional and physical absences, the ways in which people leave, are left, and whether or not it's ever possible to move on. Readers will encounter a skinny ice-cream scooper named Nina Simone, a vanishing visionary of social utopia, a French teacher who collects fiancés, and a fortune-telling mother who fails to predict the heartbreak of her own daughter. The characters in this collection will linger in the imagination, proving that nothing is ever truly forgotten.

  • Anglais All The Way

    Jordin Tootoo

    It seemed as though nothing could stop Jordin Tootoo on the ice. The captain of Canada’s Under-18, a fan favourite on the World Junior squad, and a WHL top prospect who could intimidate both goalies and enforcers, he was always a leader. And when Tootoo was drafted by Nashville in 2000 and made the Predators out of camp in 2003, he became a leader in another way: the first player of Inuk descent to suit up in the NHL. The stress of competition in the world’s top hockey league, the travel, the media, the homesickness--and the added pressure to hold one’s head high as a role model not only for the young people of his hometown of Rankin Inlet but for the culture that had given him the strength and the opportunities to succeed--would have been more than enough to challenge any rookie. But Tootoo faced something far more difficult: the loss of his brother in the year between his draft and his first shift for the Predators. Though he played through it, the tragedy took its inevitable toll. In 2010, Tootoo checked himself into rehab for alcohol addiction. It seemed a promising career had ended too soon. But that’s not the way Tootoo saw it and not the way it would end. As heir to a cultural legacy that included alcohol, despair, and suicide, Tootoo could also draw on a heritage that could help sustain him even thousands of miles away from Nunavut. And in a community haunted by the same hopelessness and substance abuse that so affected Tootoo’s life, it is not just his skill and fearlessness on the ice that have made him a hero, but the courage of his honesty to himself and to the world around him that he needed to rely on others to sustain him through his toughest challenge. All the Way tells the story of someone who has travelled far from home to realize a dream, someone who has known glory and cheering crowds, but also the demons of despair. It is the searing, honest tale of a young man who has risen to every challenge and nearly fallen short in the toughest game of all, while finding a way to draw strength from his community and heritage, and giving back to it as well.

  • Dr. Tiffany Chow offers knowledge and hope for an illness where there is, as yet, no cure. “This book is a summary of what I’ve learned through my research or from my colleagues about prevention and management of dementia,” says the empathetic doctor. “Even where there is a family history of Alzheimer’s disease, people at risk can do things to prevent its onset or progression.” Through her grandmother Ah Quan, born in 1906 in Hawaii of Chinese ancestry, Chow has a genetic legacy of Alzheimer’s disease. Comparing her life with her grandmother’s, she probes what she and other women can do to mitigate the impact of genetics through nutrition, exercise, and through the concepts of cerebral reserve and brain plasticity. But it is in her front-line role managing the suffering caused by dementia and aiding caregivers where Chow’s compassionate voice is most inspiring. The Memory Clinic is instructive and reassuring, and is a fascinating guide through the mysterious twists of the brain.

  • Anglais The Instigator

    Jonathon Gatehouse

    With a labour fight looming, and the NHL's participation in the Olympics hanging in the balance, The Instigator looks at how two decades of lockouts, soaring ticket prices, and on-ice tinkering have convinced many hard-core fans that the NHL's long-time commissioner Gary Bettman is the devil in disguise. In 1992, the gross revenue of the National Hockey League was US$400 million. This season, the figure will be closer to $2.8 billion-a seven-fold increase. Even if that were the only criterion by which to judge Bettman's twenty-year tenure as NHL commissioner, he'd be a business success story. But on his watch, professional hockey has also expanded far beyond its regional strongholds, abandoning frostbitten Canadian outposts for America's Sun Belt sprawl. The best players in the world-not just North America-all ply their trade in the league Bettman built. By taming the NHL's famously fractious owners, all but busting its players' union, and enforcing a lawyerly discipline on everything from trash talk to a Blackberry billionaire's efforts to crash the party, Bettman has become a figure of almost unrivalled power in the business of sports. His influence shapes rival leagues in other countries, dictates the schedule of the Olympic Winter Games, and spills onto the ice itself with innovations such as the shootout and a second referee, and crackdowns on obstruction and headshots. In The Instigator, Jonathan Gatehouse details the unlikely ascension of a fatherless Jewish kid from Long Island, who never played hockey and can barely skate, to the sport's biggest job. It examines his motivations, peels back his often prickly demeanour, and explains how a true outsider to the game manages to lead, confound, and keep order.

  • Anglais Royal Ransom

    Eric Walters

    Eric Walters's unforgettable romp through Canada's wilderness is now in mass market paperback. Jamie, a 13-year-old Cree boy, is surprised when his cousin asks him to help out with a trip he's escorting through Canada's North. His surprise turns to astonishment when he discovers the group includes the young Princess Victoria and Prince Andrew, who are next in line for the British throne! When kidnappers strike, taking the grownups in the group hostage, Jamie and the rest of the children are forced to battle their way back to civilization alone. Encounters with bears, rapids and the menacing kidnappers threaten to stop them at every turn, but thanks to Jamie's level headedness and Victoria's quick thinking, the children outwit their pursuers ... but they're not out of danger yet!

  • In 1999, John Ralston Saul began predicting that globalism would collapse. In 2005, he laid out this scenario in The Collapse of Globalism: and the Reinvention of the World Now he has enlarged the book, showing how today's crisis came about and suggesting what to do next. In this new edition, Saul describes the current financial crisis as a mere boil to be lanced. The far more serious problem is that the West--driven by most of its economists, managers, consultants, and columnists--remains stuck on outdated ideas of growth, wealth creation, and trade expansion. They are still trying to limit the debate to a narrow choice between protectionism and free trade and are concentrated on old-fashioned stimulation. Public policy has been dominated by the people who created this crisis. Saul envisions a new sort of wealth creation and growth, and in place of reaction, advocates new forms of action.

  • Anglais The Hanging Valley

    Peter Robinson

    It began with a faceless, maggot-ridden corpse in a tranquil, hidden valley above the village of Swainshead. Or did it really begin with the unsolved murder in the same area over five years earlier? The villagers, especially those who frequent the White Rose, are annoyingly silent. Among the suspects are the Collier brothers, Stephen and Nicholas, from the wealthiest and most powerful family in Swainsdale; John Fletcher, a local farmer; Sam Greenock, owner of the village's best guest house; and his unhappy wife, Katie, who knows more than she realizes. When the Colliers use their influence to slow down the investigation and the others clam up, Inspector Banks heads for Toronto to track down the killer. He soon finds himself in a race against time as events rush towards the shocking conclusion.

  • Anglais Final Account

    Peter Robinson

    When a mild-mannered accountant is brutally murdered, Inspector Banks is called in to investigate. It's a difficult case--the more Banks learns about the victim, Keith Rothwell, the more apparent it becomes that he was not at all what he seemed to be. Beneath the placid veneer lay a secret life of deception, sex and violence. The case takes yet another unexpected twist when Banks's old sparring partner, DS Richard "Dirty Dick" Burgess, turns up from the Yard. Haunted by his attraction to one of the suspects, a beautiful young classical musician, Banks finds himself racing against time as the killers seem to be dogging his footsteps. Only after he pits his job against his sense of justice does he discover the truth. And the truth leads him to one of the most difficult decisions of his career.

  • China’s rise is having a direct impact on our prosperity, our health and well-being, and our security here in Canada. The road to achieving many of our middle-power aspirations now runs through the Middle Kingdom. We need to start paying closer attention, says former ambassador David Mulroney. China has become our second largest economic partner, not as important as the US is, but far bigger than all the rest. Canada exerts a magnetic pull on Chinese tourists and students. It’s also a popular destination for Chinese home buyers in search of a new life or simply looking for a safe place to park money. An assertive China is challenging the balance of power in the Pacific, and it is more than willing to reach across borders, including Canada’s, to steal technologies and to confront challenges to its ideology. We must do better. David Mulroney is uniquely positioned to discuss this issue as the former ambassador to China, and as a leader in forming a successful strategy in Afghanistan. He discusses what our challenges in Afghanistan were and how we eventually got it right, and how these lessons can be applied to the future challenges of China, and beyond. Cutting right to the heart of the issue, Middle Power, Middle Kingdom is an intimate account of how foreign policy works, and how policies must be changed if Canada is to prosper.

  • Anglais Lost & Found

    Brooke Davis

    Millie Bird, seven-years old and ever hopeful, always wears red gumboots to match her curly hair. Her struggling mother, grieving the death of Millie’s father, leaves her in the big ladies’ underwear department of a local store and never returns. Agatha Pantha, eighty-two, has not left her house – or spoken to another human being – since she was widowed seven years ago. She fills the silences by yelling at passersby, watching loud static on the TV and maintaining a strict daily schedule.Karl the Touch Typist, eighty-seven, once used his fingers to type out love notes on his wife's skin. Now that she’s gone, he types his words out into the air as he speaks. Karl’s been committed to nursing home but in a moment of clarity and joy, he escapes. Now he’s on the lam.Brought together in strange circumstances, the three will embark upon a road trip across Western Australia to find Millie’s mum. Along the way, Karl wants to find out how to be a man again; Agatha just wants everything to go back to how it was.Together, they will discover that old age is not the same as death, that the young can be wise, and that letting yourself feel sad once in a while just might be the key to a happy life.

  • On her first voyage as a stewardess aboard the Empress of Ireland, Ellie is drawn to the solitary fire stoker who stands by the ship’s rail late at night, often writing in a journal. Jim. Ellie finds it hard to think of his name now. After their wonderful time in Quebec City, that awful night happened. The screams, the bodies, the frigid waters … she tries hard to tell herself that he survived, but it’s hard to believe when so many didn’t. So when Wyatt Steele, journalist at The New York Times asks her for her story, Ellie refuses. But when he shows her Jim’s journal, she jumps at the chance to be able to read it herself, to find some trace of the man she had fallen in love with, or perhaps a clue to what happened to him. There’s only one catch: she will have to tell her story to Steele and he’ll “pay” her by giving her the journal, one page at a time.

  • Anglais Tiger Hills

    Sarita Mandanna

    As the first girl born to the Nachimada family in over 60 years, the beautiful Devi is the object of adoration of her entire family. Strong-willed and confident, she befriends the shy Devanna, a young boy whose mother has died under tragic circumstances. The two quickly become inseparable, until Devi meets Machu the tiger killer, a hunter of great repute and a man of much honour and pride. Soon they fall deeply in love, an attraction that drives a wedge between Devi and Devanna. It is this tangled relationship among the three that leads to a devastating tragedy--an event that forever changes their fates and has unforeseen and far-reaching consequences for generations to come.

  • Anglais The Raven's Gift

    Don Rearden

    John Morgan and his wife can barely contain their excitement upon arriving as the new teachers in a Yup'ik Eskimo village on the windswept Alaskan tundra. But their move proves disastrous when a deadly epidemic strikes and the isolated community descends into total chaos. When outside aid fails to arrive, John’s only hope lies in escaping the snow-covered tundra and the hunger of the other survivors--he must make the thousand-mile trek across the Alaskan wilderness for help. He encounters a blind Eskimo girl and an elderly woman who need his protection, and he needs their knowledge of the terrain to survive. The harsh journey pushes him beyond his limits as he discovers a new sense of hope and the possibility of loving again.

  • Open secrets are the heart of gossip--the things that no one is brave or clueless enough to ask. That is, except for Normandy Pale and her friends Dusk and Neil. They are juniors at Green Pastures Academy of Art and Applied Design, and they have no fear. They are the Truth Commission. But Normandy’s passion for uncovering the truth is not entirely heartfelt. The truth can be dangerous, especially when it involves her sister, Keira, her brilliant older sister, the creator of a best-selling graphic novel series, who has left college and come home under mysterious circumstances, and in complete silence. Even for a Truth Commissioner, there are some lines that cannot be crossed … This dryly funny, knife-sharp novel, written as "narrative nonfiction" by Normandy herself, features footnotes, illustrations and a combination mystery/love story that will capture readers from the first page.

  • Mayors Gone Bad, a series of profiles of recent and current Canadian mayors gone amok, is an entertaining companion volume to the bestselling Lawyers Gone Bad. Whether they’ve misappropriated funds, had cosy relationships with Mafia hoods, been caught with prostitutes, or admitted to smoking crack, Canada’s mayors are a colourful collection: Peter Kelly, long-serving mayor of Halifax, driven from office by investigative reporting of ethical lapses; Gerard Tremblay of Montreal resigned in suspicious circumstances; Michael Applebaum of Montreal faces criminal charges of fraud; Gilles Vaillancourt of Laval also resigned and faces similar criminal charges; Alexandre Duplessis of Laval left after a hooker scandal; Joe Fontana was convicted of fraud and is under house arrest; Susan Fennell of Brampton was under police investigation for possible criminal use of city funds; Sam Katz of Winnipeg was dogged throughout his mayoralty by conflict-of-interest allegations; and Rob Ford made headlines across North America as “the crack-smoking mayor of Toronto.” But it’s not all bad news: Philip Slayton writes about the “western triangle of mayoral goodness,” Nenshi of Calgary, Iveson of Edmonton, and Robertson of Vancouver. Also, Slayton features four foreign mayors who have made an impact: Jón Gnarr of Reykjavik, Boris Johnson of London, Michael Bloomberg of New York, and Anne Hidalgo of Paris. Aside from creating a rogues’ gallery of mayors, Slayton offers insight into the nature of municipal government in Canada and speculates about why people seek the office of mayor. Little real power is exercised by any mayor, but the abuses of that power are nonetheless significant. As well, Slayton provides a series of proposals to reform municipal government. Written with the dry wit that made Lawyers Gone Bad a national bestseller, Slayton’s new book is an eye-opening look at how we are governed. From the Hardcover edition.

  • It was like a scene out of a thriller: one night in April 2012, China’s most famous political activist--a blind, self-taught lawyer--climbed over the wall of his heavily guarded home and escaped. For days, his whereabouts remained unknown; after he turned up at the American embassy in Beijing, a furious round of high-level negotiations finally led to his release and a new life in the United States. Chen Guangcheng is a unique figure on the world stage, but his story is even more remarkable than we knew. The son of a poor farmer in rural China, blinded by illness when he was an infant, Chen was fortunate to survive a difficult childhood. But despite his disability, he was determined to educate himself and fight for the rights of his country’s poor, especially a legion of women who had endured forced sterilizations under the hated “one child” policy. Repeatedly harassed, beaten, and imprisoned by Chinese authorities, Chen was ultimately placed under house arrest. After a year of fruitless protest and increasing danger, he evaded his captors and fled to freedom. Both a riveting memoir and a revealing portrait of modern China, this passionate book tells the story of a man who has never accepted limits and always believed in the power of the human spirit to overcome any obstacle.

  • Gartner is a deft practitioner of irony and stylishly detached prose, and here she is in top form in an unsparing satire. At once hilariously biting and deeply disturbing, "The Adopted Chinese Daughters' Rebellion" is a savage exposé of unthinking privilege and middle-class blindness.

  • Anglais The Electric Man

    Johanna Skibsrud

    Giller prize winning Johanna Skibsrud's stories are both wise and querying, showing us through her characters' eyes what even they cannot see. In "The Electric Man," a woman's safe world is confronted and doubted by an unusual man. Does he despise her, or like her too much? Through their uneasy time together, false perceptions give way to greater truths.

  • It includes an essay and a short story by the author. Wonder: The advent of Webmind--a vast consciousness that spontaneously emerged from the infrastructure of the World Wide Web--is changing everything. From curing cancer to easing international tensions, Webmind seems a boon to humanity. But Colonel Peyton Hume, the Pentagon's top expert on artificial intelligence, is convinced Webmind is a threat. He turns to the hacker underground to help him bring Webmind down. Then, hackers start mysteriously vanishing. Is Webmind killing them before they can mount an attack? Meanwhile, Caitlin Decter--the once-blind 16-year-old math genius who discovered Webmind-- desperately tries to protect her friend. And Masayuki Kuroda, the scientist whose implant gave Caitlin sight, modifies his technology to help Sinanthropus, a paraplegic Chinese freedom blogger, regain use of his legs--unaware of Sinanthropus's role in China's plans to eliminate Webmind. Can this new world of wonder survive--or will everything, Webmind included, come crashing down?

  • The bestselling author of The Loyalty Leap applies the principles of customer intimacy to a business-to-business context. Since the publication of New York Times bestseller The Loyalty Leap, Bryan Pearson's customer loyalty approach to marketing has changed the way many organizations use their customer data. Small coffee shops and large corporations have applied the Loyalty Leap principles to effectively deliver mutual value to customers. But many readers have asked the same question: "How can I apply these lessons in a business-to-business context?" While the principles outlined in The Loyalty Leap hold true whether the customer is an individual or a business, the application of the Loyalty Leap steps can vary. While an individual might respond favorably to one sales pitch, a large corporation with a complicated sales chain might respond very differently. Drawing on his own experience and extensive research, Pearson helps B2B marketers avoid the pitfalls of loyalty marketing to businesses. He helps marketers segment their market into small business, large enterprise, and channel marketers, and explains how a customer loyalty plan can be adapted for each segment. Sharing case studies of successful B2B loyalty initiatives from leaders such as American Express, PHX, Teradata and Salesforce.com, he shows that B2B organizations can successfully take The Loyalty Leap. The Loyalty Leap for B2B is a practical guide that will help you cultivate loyalty among your business customers

  • Anglais The Dead Roads

    D W Wilson

    The Winner of the BBC Short Story Award, "The Dead Roads" was acclaimed as "note perfect" and "perfectly constructed" by the jury. Wilson's unforgettable tale of two friends trying to win the affections of a girl in the middle of a road-trip through a gothic landscape is a masterpiece of tension and understatement.

  • The key to personal choice, and even happiness, is to gain control of our attention--our mental lives. Matthew Crawford is the author of Shop Class as Soulcraft, which challenged our notions about what we do and how it affects our sense of self (and our happiness). This new book addresses the crisis of attention: where we focus -- or cannot focus--equally affects our sense of self. As our mental lives become more fragmented, what is at stake often seems to be nothing less than the question of whether one can maintain a coherent self. The key to a better life then is to get command not just of one’s physical environment, but of one’s mental life, too. Like Shop Class as Soulcraft, Crawford uses case studies as well as entertaining musings from his own personal observations to describe the fundamental shift surrounding attention that is happening in our culture. From making a surfboard, to parenting, to anxiously navigating the inside of an airport--all provide clues to a phenomenon that we increasingly experience, but could not put into words, until now. An accessible and food for thought kind of look at what our difficulties with attention mean for us as free thinking people.

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